How to Construct Presentations that Sell!

The dramatization, or showmanship, in your sales presentation allows you to appeal to as many of the client's senses as possible. The more of his senses you can involve the more impact your product will have. Ask him to handle it, feel it, use it, if appropriate taste it, smell it or listen to it. Taste, touch, smell, looking involve the emotions. Build into your demonstration every opportunity for your client to become physically and emotionally involved with your product or service. While he is engaged with your product you can observe him and watch for signs of emotion, signs that he is believing, believing, accepting or rejecting, the things you have said.

Remember only one third of what we hear is absorbed. The more senses we use in the learning process, the more information registers in the mind. Consequently the more you can use visual aids, the closer you will bring your client to the product. The elements, which make up showmanship are, Interest, Drama, Emotion, Excitement and Action.

Remember it's your dramatic presentation that earns you the money that will make your life a success. Take time to study your approach, your opening of the sale, the way you present the benefits, backed up by the features of the product, the way you expect possible objections and how you counter them, and then how you close the sale. The Success Formula.

Initially I was taught to construct the sale around the word "IDEA" I = Interest: D = Desire: E = Enthusiasm: A = Action. Interest it is created by identifying a problem or a need that the client might have. Desire is stimulated by introducing your product as a solution to the problem. Enthusiasm is built up by highlighting the benefits your product will bring to it through the features of the product.

Action is engaged in by making it easy to buy using your closing questions. EG: would you like the red version or would you prefer blue? Would you like to pay now or on delivery? This structure of a presentation worked well for me a number of years, until I learned of a new and better formula. This has since proved to be a superior superior way of structuring a sale. The formula is DIPADA.

If you learn this structure and apply it, your presentations will flow more naturally to a close … D = Disturb: I = Interest: P = Proof: A = Acceptance: D = Desire: A = Action. D = Disturb your client by pointing out his need or his problem. It's often the case that he is not aware that he has a problem. I = Interest him in the product by introducing it as is a solution to this problem. P = Prove that your product will be the ideal solution, get him to accept and agree that the product fits his need.

Proof and acceptance go together, Proof can also be provided by third-party testimonials or referrals to other satisfied users (especially if they are in the same line of business as himself.) A = Acceptance of the proof you give him is important, if he does not accept the proof that your product or service will satisfy his need he will not buy it. D = Desire is built by stressing the benefits of owning your product which arise from its features. These might include the quality, price, safety, service or the guarantee, particularly those things that you notice have done his attention. A = Action must be the close of the sale. This you can do at any point in the presentation by the use of trial closes.

To test whether the client is ready to buy you can ask closing questions: "What color would you prefer?" – "Would you like the standard model or would the deluxe suit you better?" I used DIPADA to build up every kind of presentation I have made ever since. I even used it to construct sales letters. I have found the Proof and Acceptance area is the point at which you can introduce the common or standard objections yourself. When volunteered and dealt with in this way they disarm the client, which makes for a smooth flow through your presentation. By the end of your presentation the client is willing to buy and does not feel as though he has been sold. It becomes a purchase rather than a sale.



Source by Don Westacott